Kinds

Powdery Mealybug

Powdery mealybug (Pseudococcus longispinus) – damages the plants of females and larvae. The body of an adult female of 3.5 mm is elongated-oval in shape, orange or pink in color, covered with a white coating. The worm has well-developed legs, so they can easily move from plant to plant. Females are viviparous. Usually, they accumulate in the form of colonies on the underside of the leaf, on the branches, in the axils of the leaves and on the young tips of the shoots. The bristle worm is a rather large insect, easily visible on the plant due to the white powdery coating that covers its body, and white waxy formations in the form of cotton lumps. Damaged leaves turn yellow and fall. Shoots are stunted. Worms are taken under the bark of citrus fruits and under the scales of bulbs in bulbs. Damaged by the worm plants are greatly inhibited, lagging behind in growth, leaves turn yellow and fall. Sooty fungi can settle on the discharge of worms.

Mealy Mealybug

Mealy mealybug (Pseudococcus citri) – the body of the female is broadly oval in shape, pink or yellow in color, covered with a white powdery coating. The legs are well developed. Males are very rare. Hatching larvae spread throughout the plant, on shoots, on leaves along the main veins. With a severe defeat, the worms form enormous colonies that suck out all the juices from the plant. Leaves turn yellow, shoots dry out. Sooty fungi settle on the insects of worms.

Seaside Mealybug

Seaside mealybug (Pseudococcus affinis) – is one of the most common types of worms. The body of an adult female is elongated-oval, 3-4 mm long, 2-2.5 mm wide, grayish-pink, covered with a white powdery coating. The legs are well developed. Males are much smaller, winged, fly all summer. Females lay their eggs in egg sacs, which are a white, fluffy, shapeless mass of waxy spider webs. Usually, oviparous females hide in secluded places: cracks in the bark, in twisted leaves, in a fork in the branches. Larvae are small, mobile, yellow, completely devoid of wax coating.

They quickly spread throughout the plant, spread by wind, man, and animals to other plants. Larvae turn into an adult insect in 1-1.5 months. Sucking all the juices from the plant, they cause growth retardation, and then the death of the plant. Damaged plants grow weakly and do not bloom. Sooty fungi settle on the insects of worms. Leaves turn yellow and fall.

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